BC3F1: BC3F2: L33p25p7 (QTLs A, B, I and J1 fixed); L33p25p13 (QTL J1 and J2 in heterozygous state); and L33p27p16 (QTL J2 in heterozygous state). | Crop Management (Crop Varieties)

Development of Kenyan FPSV Ochuti (with Striga resistance)technology; was done using Marker Assisted Selection to introgress Strigaresistance Quantitative Trait Loci (QTLs) from an Indian durra N13 into alocally preferred sorghum variety Ochuti. Seeds for BC3F1 from a BMZ projectand parental line were sown in the greenhouse, and leaves were harvested a Read more..

Description of the technology or innovation

Development of Kenyan FPSV Ochuti (with Striga resistance)technology; was done using Marker Assisted Selection to introgress Strigaresistance Quantitative Trait Loci (QTLs) from an Indian durra N13 into alocally preferred sorghum variety Ochuti. Seeds for BC3F1 from a BMZ projectand parental line were sown in the greenhouse, and leaves were harvested aftertwo (2) weeks of germination. The leaves were then processed and DNA extractiondone. A total of 11 SSR polymorphic markers were used in the foreground selectionto trace the Striga resistance QTLs. This was done before flowering in order toselect the plants with the QTLs to be backcrossed to the recurrent parentOchuti to generate BC4F1. The same methodology was repeated to generate BC5F1.Introgression of Striga resistant QTLs was successful in five plants. Thedetails of the backcrosses (BC3F1 and BC3F2) used are shown below:

Assessment/reflection on utilization, dissemination & scaling out or up approaches used

The ultimate beneficiaries of the technology are conventional andmolecular breeders who will use it in further advancing and fixing QTLs as wellas bulking/increasing seed for phenotypic validation. The technology wasvalidated through use of molecular markers to trace the Striga resistance QTLs.However, phenotypic validation at the time of development of the technology hadnot been done. The seeds with QTLs were multiplied and field trials done underartificial Striga infestation.

Current situation and future scaling up

The technology provides building blocks for development of Strigaresistant sorghum varieties. This is an opportunity to prevent yield lossescaused by Striga, improving yields and enhancing income. It is therefore likelyto be embraced as it addresses a salient problem in sorghum production andinvolves a farmer preferred variety. Striga control should translate intoincreased crop yields and subsequently improved food security. Continuedsharing and exchange of information is critical as the technology enters uptakepathways. It is therefore important that information continues be sharedamongst scientists for further development of Striga resistant sorghumvarieties.

Economic Considerations

The technology is likely to boost food security and farmers’ incomesboth in the short and long periods.

Gender considerations

The technology is considered gendersensitive as many farmers who are likely to benefit from it are women who contributemost of the family labour work force.

Contact details

Jackyline Abigail Ngugi;

Scientist, University of Nairobi;

P.O. Box 25171-00603;

Nairobi, Kenya.

Tel: +254-720998128

Mob: +254-736402301

Email: abigailngugi@gmail.com

 

Eliud K. Ngugi;

Scientist, University of Nairobi (UON);

P.O. Box 29053;

Nairobi, Kenya.

Email: Kahiu.ngugi@yahoo.com

 

Eunice Mutitu;

Scientist, University of Nairobi (UON);

P.O. Box 29053;

Nairobi, Kenya.

 

Dan Kiambi;

Scientist, African Biodiversity Conservation & InnovationCentre (ABCIC);

P.O. Box 100882-00101;

Nairobi, Kenya.

Tel: +254-20-2330014

Mob: +254-722926086

Email: d.kiambi@abcic.org

 

Santie Devilliers;

Scientist, International Crops Research Institute for theSemi-Arid Tropics (ICRISAT);

P.O. Box 30709-00100;

Nairobi, Kenya.

Tel: +254-20-4223476

Mob: +254-733-220874

Email: s.devilliers@cgiar.org


Additional information

The technology was validated through use of molecular markers totrace the Striga resistance QTLs, but phenotypic validation has not yet beendone. The seeds with QTLs were multiplied and field trials done underartificial Striga infestation.


Glossary

Haussmann, B.I.G. 2001c. Pattern analysis of genotype xenvironment interaction for Striga resistance and grain yield in Africa sorghumtrials. Euphytica. 122, 297-308.

 

Kroschel, J. 1999. Analysis of the Striga problem, the first steptoward future joint action. In: J. Krochel et al., (ed). Advances in parasiticweed control at on-farm level


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